Vector illustration of a wireless video system

The Best Wireless Video Systems for Live Production (2024)

This is a complete list of wireless video systems I use and trust for live production and mobile cameras in corporate events, houses of worship, concerts, sports, festivals, broadcasts, and more.

Teradek Bolt 6 LT

 product image

The best overall wireless video system for most users.

Get Price at Amazon Get Price at Adorama

Teradek/Amimon is THE name when it comes to reliable, near-zero latency, uncompressed video transmission.

The Teradek Bolt 6 LT 750 offers 3G-SDI and HDMI support, 10-bit 4:2:2 color, HDR support, and a maximum transmission distance of 750 feet.

And now that the Bolt series has moved to the less crowded 6 GHz spectrum, it is more consistent and solid than ever before.

If you're looking for the best bang for the buck wireless SDI transmission for your live productions, look no further.

Need greater range? Check out the Teradek Bolt 6 LT 1500 kit (Amazon / Adorama) and the Teradek Bolt 6 LT MAX kit (Amazon / Adorama).

Need 6G-SDI or 12G-SDI capability? Check out the Teradek Bolt 6 XT 750 kit (Amazon / Adorama), Teradek Bolt 6 XT 1500 kit (Amazon / Adorama), and Teradek Bolt 6 XT MAX kit (Adorama).


Pros

  • Near-zero latency
  • Performance for the price
  • Variety of configurations and capabilities

Cons

  • Extra cost for V-Mount or Gold Mount battery plates
  • Tall transmitter form factor awkward for some camera setups

Teradek Bolt 6 LT Specifications
Network Non-DFS Frequencies: 5.190 ~ 5.230 GHz, 5.755 ~ 5.795 GHz, 5.945 ~ 6.425GHz
DFS Frequencies: 5.270 ~ 5.670 GHz
RF Channel Selection Auto
Manual
Encryption AES-256 (RSA-1024 key exchange)
Transmitter I/O 1 x 3G-SDI input
1 x HDMI 1.4b input (Type A - Full Size)
1 x 3G-SDI output (loop output of SDI or HDMI inputs)
Receiver I/O 2 x 3G-SDI outputs
1 x HDMI 1.4b output (Type A - Full Size)
Supported Formats 3840 x 2160 up to 30 fps (HDMI only)
1920 x 1080 up to 60 fps
1280 x 720 up to 60 fps
Maximum Transmission Distance LT 750: 750 feet / 228 meters (line of sight)
LT 1500: 1500 feet / 457 meters (line of sight)
LT MAX: 5000 feet / 1524 meters (line of sight)
Transmitter Power 1 x 2-pin LEMO connector (6-28 VDC)
1 x Sony/Canon dual battery plate (optional)
9 watts maximum power draw
Receiver Power 1 x 2-pin LEMO connector (6-28 VDC)
1 x Gold or V-mount battery plate (optional)
11 watts maximum power draw
Minimum Latency < 0.001 second
Multicasting Yes (one transmitter to up to six receivers)

Cinegears Ghost-Eye 200M

 product image

The best value wireless video system for live production.

Get Price at Amazon Get Price at Adorama

Near-zero latency, impressive transmission distance, and 3G-SDI and HDMI support make the Cinegears Ghost-Eye 200M kit an impressive bang for the buck.

It even ships with L-Series battery plates on the transmitter and receiver, allowing you to power the system with lower cost NP batteries straight out of the box.

The transmitter and receiver also include 2-pin LEMO power inputs, providing for a variety of power options.

All in all, this is a great solution if you're not dealing with a crowded 5 GHz environment and looking to save a few bucks from the top pick.

And if you want better uptime and/or greater transmission distance, I highly recommend investing in the Ghost-Eye Extra Large Panel Receiver Antenna (Adorama).


Pros

  • Value
  • Near-zero latency
  • Included L-Series battery plates

Cons

  • Uses crowded 5 GHz spectrum
  • Limited channel selection

Cinegears Ghost-Eye 200M Specifications
Network 5.1 ~ 5.9 GHz
RF Channel Selection Semi-Manual (choose between 9 presets)
Encryption AES-128
Transmitter I/O 1 x 3G-SDI input
1 x HDMI 1.4b input (Type A - Full Size)
Receiver I/O 1 x 3G-SDI output
1 x HDMI 1.4b output (Type A - Full Size)
Supported Formats 1920 x 1080 up to 60 fps
1280 x 720 up to 60 fps
Maximum Transmission Distance 656 feet / 200 meters
Transmitter Power 1 x 2-pin LEMO connector (7-36 VDC)
8 watts maximum power draw
Receiver Power 1 x 2-pin LEMO connector (7-36 VDC)
7 watts maximum power draw
Minimum Latency < 0.001 second
Multicasting Yes

Teradek Bolt 6 LT HDMI

 product image

The best budget wireless video system for live production.

Get Price at Amazon Get Price at Adorama

The Teradek Bolt 6 LT HDMI offers nearly all the same great capabilities as the top pick, just without SDI - a significant savings for users that only need HDMI.

  • Supports up to 3840 x 2160 at 30 fps
  • Supports up to 1920 x 1080 at 60 fps
  • 750' maximum transmission distance
  • Uncompressed 10-bit 4:2:2 video
  • Near-zero latency
  • Variety of power options

  • Pros

    • Near-zero latency
    • Performance for the price

    Cons

    • Extra cost for V-Mount or Gold Mount battery plates
    • Tall transmitter form factor awkward for some camera setups

    Teradek Bolt 6 LT HDMI Specifications
    Network Non-DFS Frequencies: 5.190 ~ 5.230 GHz, 5.755 ~ 5.795 GHz, 5.945 ~ 6.425GHz
    DFS Frequencies: 5.270 ~ 5.670 GHz
    RF Channel Selection Auto
    Manual
    Encryption AES-256 (RSA-1024 key exchange)
    Transmitter I/O 1 x HDMI 1.4b input (Type A - Full Size)
    1 x HDMI 1.4b loop output
    Receiver I/O 1 x HDMI 1.4b output (Type A - Full Size)
    Supported Formats 3840 x 2160 up to 30 fps (HDMI only)
    1920 x 1080 up to 60 fps
    1280 x 720 up to 60 fps
    Maximum Transmission Distance 750 feet / 228 meters (line of sight)
    Transmitter Power 1 x 2-pin LEMO connector (6-28 VDC)
    1 x Sony/Canon dual battery plate (optional)
    7 watts maximum power draw
    Receiver Power 1 x 2-pin LEMO connector (6-28 VDC)
    1 x Gold or V-mount battery plate (optional)
    6 watts maximum power draw
    Minimum Latency < 0.001 second
    Multicasting Yes (one transmitter to up to six receivers)

Wave Central

 product image

The best wireless video system money can buy.

Learn more at Wave Central

When the pros demand reliability and uptime, they often turn to Wave Central.

Wave Central offers a variety of top notch RF video systems that are engineered to deliver in the most extreme conditions and environments.

Be warned - these systems are not cheap. But they are worth every penny if you expect peak performance.


Pros

  • Uptime and reliability
  • Customer support
  • Wide selection of systems and networks

Cons

  • Price points out of reach for most
  • Still some latency

Wave Central Specifications
Network Systems available in 2, 5.8, or 7.1 GHz configurations
RF Channel Selection Auto
Manual
Transmitter I/O SDI and HDMI I/O options available
Receiver I/O SDI and HDMI I/O options available
Supported Formats 3840 x 2160 up to 60 fps available
Maximum Transmission Distance Transmission dependent upon transmitter and receiver configuration
Minimum Latency < 0.02 second encoder latency
Multicasting Yes

Why You Can Trust Me

I started my career over 24 years ago as a freelance live and ENG camera operator for broadcast television networks including ABC, FOX Sports, and Speed Channel. Since then, I have spent countless hours with hundreds of different cameras transmitting video wirelessly using all kinds of technologies. Additionally, I have spent the last decade running this website and consulting with organizations to help them find the right cameras and maximize their results. Learn more about Joel


Wireless Video System Buyer's Guide

Wireless video transmission systems transmit a video signal wirelessly from one location to another.

They always...

  • Have at least one transmitter that:
    • Accepts a wired video signal (usually HDMI and/or SDI)
    • Converts the wired video signal to either an uncompressed or a compressed wireless signal
    • Transmits/sends the wireless signal out over a wireless frequency through antenna(s)
  • Have at least one receiver that:
    • Accepts the wireless signal from the transmitter
    • Converts the wireless signal back to uncompressed video
    • Transmits/sends the uncompressed video signal out over wired connections (usually HDMI and/or SDI)
  • Can be powered in various ways

They sometimes...

  • Transmit embedded audio
  • Transmit embedded ancillary data (timecode, record triggers, etc.)
  • Have manual frequency selection (to coordinate within congested RF areas or use multiple systems together)
  • Multicast - transmit one signal to multiple receivers

I Recommend Wireless Video Systems For:

  • Situations where cables will be a potential hazard
    • Handheld cameras
    • Gimbal/stabilizer cameras
    • Cable cameras
    • POV cameras attached to moving objects
    • On-set monitoring
  • Situations where running a cable is physically impossible
  • Testing and adjustment purposes

I Do Not Recommend Wireless Video Systems For:

  • Situations where you don't feel like running a cable
  • Sending signals to projection or displays in a live video system
  • Distribution to closed circuit destinations (lobbies, overflow venues, digital signage, classrooms, etc.)

Learn more about Best Practices: Wired > Wireless

Latency

If you use wireless camera feeds in live production, especially for IMAG, then latency becomes an important factor.

The more latency that occurs within an IMAG signal, the more distracting it becomes.

In general, it is best to aim for less than 1/10th of a second (100 milliseconds) of latency for all IMAG feeds. For example, three frames or less at 30 fps and six frames or less at 60 fps.

Keep in mind, even a single millisecond of latency will usually add a full frame at the receiving end due to frame sync requirements.

IMPORTANT: I have never found a cheaper wireless video system that comes close to matching the low latency of the budget pick above.

Considerations

Here are some important things to know before purchasing a wireless system:

  • You get what you pay for
  • Wireless uncompressed video is exponentially more difficult to do well compared to audio or data
  • If you want reliability, consistency, and low latency then the budget pick above is the bare minimum budget I recommend to achieve all of that
  • Many wireless video systems are designed for on-set monitoring for directors and DoPs, not for live production
  • Systems specifically designed for live broadcast production can easily cost $10,000 or more
  • Latency can vary depending on many settings and conditions
  • Maximum transmission distances claimed by manufacturers are rarely possible in real world conditions, so expect about half of what product specifications claim
  • Transmitting through walls and/or ceilings will cut the reliable transmission distance substantially, often by more than 75%
  • For best results, always place the receiver as close as possible to the transmitter and within line of sight if possible
  • If a manufacturer offers upgraded external antennas for the unit you choose, definitely invest in them
  • Many systems only have standard DC power ports - battery plates are often an added cost
  • Stick with reputable battery brands like Anton Bauer, Sony, Canon, Core SWX, or IDX
  • Receivers and transmitters require at least two meters of space between each other for reliability
  • Wireless frequencies and wireless laws vary by country, so be sure to get wireless systems that are approved for your location

What About ______?

I'm sure many will ask why brands like Hollyland, Vaxis, Accsoon, or DJI are not in this list.

Others may ask why there are no options under $1,000 USD.

The reason is simple...

Latency.

Wireless systems from those brands can be good and there are also plenty of options under $1,000 USD, but their latency is a deal breaker for live production.

✓ Link copied to clipboard